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Petzl Basic

(a.k.a. Bloquer, Jammer)

Version B Version A Version C Version D
Version A Version B Version C Version D
 
Version E Version F Version G Version H
Version E Version F Version G Version H
 
Version I Version J Version K Version L
Version I Version J Version K Version L
Version M Version N Version O Version P
Version M Version N Version O Version P

Overview


The May 2007 Petzl corporate brochure shows a picture of the first Petzl Basic, brought to market in 1968 under the name "Products Fernand Petzl" (Fernand Petzl Products). If you can help me get one of the original Petzl Basic ascenders for my collection, please email me. First Petzl Basic

The Basic (a.k.a. Jammer, a.k.a. Bloquer, a.k.a. Blocker) is a very popular ascender. Its light weight and small size certainly enhance its popularity. Here is a quick summary of the versions in my collection:

  1. , Z-tooth cam, flat rivets
    (#2130)
  2. Left- and right-handed versions made, Z-tooth cam, semi-tubular rivets
    (#202, 1539, 1540, 2129)
  3. Right-handed only, anodized shell
    (#12)
  4. Lower attachment hole not beveled
    (#13)
  5. New toothed cam with down-climbing flat, new cam safety with pin
    (#14, 1592)
  6. Cam flat eliminated, new cam safety
    (#1553)
  7. Second top hole, reinforced shell, slotted cam
    (#1577)
  8. Round cam stop
    (#15)
  9. New lower shell design
    (#1570)
  10. Anodized safety
    (#2066)
  11. Another new lower shell design
    (#1912)
  12. CE stamped
    (#2083)
  13. New shell design, stamped cam stop, new cam design, plastic cam safety
    (#125)
  14. Two small holes behind the cam
    (#2082)
  15. Additional hole below cam
    (#277, 2084)
  16. Smaller, full redesign
    (#1943, 2059)

Version A
(#2130)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired three Petzl Basic, Version A ascenders in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

This version is 101 mm. tall, 77 mm. wide, 23 mm. thick, and weighs 116 g. The rope channel is 16 mm. wide. The cam radius increases from 40 to 51 mm. over an angle of 43°, giving a 19° cam angle. The cam has 14 "z" teeth cast into the cam.

The shell has no markings. The cam has "ZEDEL" in raised cast letters.

Comments

Pull-tested Basic - Top Pull-tested Basic - Front Bob tested one of these ascenders to failure. That ascender was one of the three that I acquired when I received his collection. He described the test results as follows (Prusiking, 1971):

At 800 lbs the body was bending. At 900 lbs, the body sprang apart enough for the cam to swing through. The ascender was totally inoperable. Even the cam had been bent.

These units are weaker than other mechanical ascenders, but are comparable in strength to quarter-inch poly slings, which some cavers use.

Bob Thrun also wrote that these were available in left- and right-handed versions, with and without safety catch, for a total of four versions.

If you can help me acquire any Petzls without the safety catch, please email me.

Version B
(#202, 1539, 1540, 2129)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired a right-handed Petzl Basic, Version B from Luc Bourguignon in 2005. In 2010 I acquired a pair from Julian Turner. I acquired another pair in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

This version is 100 mm. tall, 76 mm. wide, 24 mm. thick, and weighs 113 g. The rope channel is 16 mm. wide. The cam radius increases from 38 to 51 mm. over an angle of 43°, giving a 22° cam angle. The cam has 12 "z" teeth cast into the cam, plus a single sprue between the fifth and sixth "z" teeth.

The back of the shell is stamped "F. PETZL" (inside an oval) and "FRANCE." The cam has "ZEDEL" in raised cast letters.

Comments

These are the earliest Petzl ascenders in my collection. Petzl originally made the Basic in left- and right-handed versions, but soon discontinued the left-handed version.

Bob Thrun (Prusiking, 1971) reports that these were available in left- and right-handed versions, with and without safety catch, for a total of four versions. Bob tested one of these ascenders to failure. He wrote, "At 800 lbs the body was bending. At 900 lbs, the body sprang apart enough for the cam to swing through. The ascender was totally inoperable. Even the cam had been bent. These units are weaker than other mechanical ascenders, but are comparable in strength to quarter-inch poly slings, which some cavers use."

Bob has a pair of these with round-headed cam rivets.

Aside from the lack of anodizing, the right-handed Version B is essentially the same as Version C.

If you can help me acquire any of these without the safety catch, please email me.

Version C (B8)
(#12)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I obtained this ascender from Speleoshoppe in about 1982.

This version is right-handed. The ascender is 100 mm. high, 76 mm. wide, 24 mm. thick, and weighs 122 grams. The ascender shell is subtriangular light blue anodized shape bent from 4.2 mm. aluminum sheet. The rope channel is formed by bending the left side of the ascender into a U. The rope channel is 15 mm. in diameter. The main sling attachment point is a beveled 13 mm. hole located below the cam near the rope channel. A second attachment point consists of two beveled 13 mm. holes through the rope channel U and just above the cam. The right end of the shell is bent on an inclined axis to form another U. A hole drilled through both sides of the U accepts a semi-tubular rivet. The cam and cam spring are mounted on this rivet. The head of the rivet sits into a stamped depression on the back of the cam, while the roll is exposed on the open side. The pivot is centered 49 mm. from the inside of the rope groove.

The cam is a plated skeletonized aluminum casting. The cam radius, measured from the pivot, increases from 40 to 51 mm. over an angle of 42 degrees. The cam has 12 "z" teeth cast into the cam, plus a single sprue between the fifth and sixth "z" teeth. A spring-loaded manual safety bar is mounted on the bottom of the cam with a solid pin. The normal action of the spring holds the safety against the cam. When the cam is opened, the shell interferes with the safety bar, thus preventing opening the cam. If the safety bar is moved away from the cam (opposing the spring), it will clear the shell and the cam will open. At full open the safety can be released and the spring will hold the safety against the back of the shell. A small tab fits into a small drilled in the back of the shell cam U and holds the cam open. A bent tab on the bottom of the safety bar assists in operating the safety mechanism.

The back of the shell is stamped "F. PETZL" (inside an oval) and "FRANCE." The cam has "ZEDEL" in raised cast letters.

Comments

This ascender dates from the 1960s. The shell is adequate but the cam is not. The soft cam wears quickly, the teeth are inadequate in mud, and in general the cam is poorly executed. Versions D and later are much better ascenders.

 


Version D (B8)
(#13)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version D from Speleoshoppe in about 1982.

This version is 100 mm. tall, 76 mm. wide, 24 mm. thick, and weighs 119 g. The rope channel is 16 mm. wide. The cam radius increases from 38 to 51 mm. over an angle of 43°, giving a 22° cam angle. The cam has 12 "z" teeth cast into the cam, plus a single sprue between the fifth and sixth "z" teeth.

The back of the shell is stamped "PETZL" (inside an oval), "MAXI 400KG," "BREVETE," and "FRANCE." The cam has "ZEDEL" in raised cast letters.

Comments

When I bought this ascender, it was paired with the Version C ascender. Version D does not have the beveled attachment hole that Version C has.


Version E (B8)
(#14, 1592)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired a pair of these ascenders from Speleoshoppe in 1979, and another in like-new condition from Lee Newman in 2012.

This version is right-handed, 100 mm. high, 76 mm. wide, 26 mm. thick, and weighs 138 grams. The rope channel is 17 mm. wide. The shell is essentially identical to Version D except the anodizing is a darker blue, and the upper end of the rope groove is flared to 17.5 mm. The lower attachment hole is not beveled.

Version E introduces a new, superior cam and a new cam safety. The cam is a plated skeletonized steel casting. The cam radius, measured from the pivot, increases from 38 to 52 mm. over an angle of 38 degrees. The cam has number of small conical teeth, all of which have their axes approximately parallel to the lower surface of the cam. The tooth pattern is (F)(3.4)^3(3.2)^2. The F stands for a short flat area designed to allow the user to cant the ascender and slide it down the rope without opening the cam. A spring-loaded manual safety bar is mounted on the bottom of the cam with a somewhat cracked steel semi-tubular rivet. The normal action of the spring holds the safety against the cam. When the cam is opened, the shell interferes with the safety bar, thus preventing opening the cam. If the safety bar is moved away from the cam (opposing the spring), it will clear the shell and the cam will open. At full open the safety can be released and the spring will hold the safety against the back of the shell. This provides a means of locking the cam open. A cylindrical knob on the safety bar assists in operating the safety mechanism. The shell detent is omitted since the new cam safety design does not require it.

The back of the shell is stamped "PETZL" inside an oval, "MAXI 400 KG," "BREVETE," and "FRANCE."

Comments

With the advent of the steel cam, the Petzl Jammer became a viable ascender. The ascender is well made, and the cam teeth are among the finest in my collection. The only oversight is that the lower attachment hole is not beveled. Single-handed operation of the Jammer is rather difficult. Left-handed operation particularly difficult as expected for a right-handed ascender.

The flat area on the cam caused some confusion. Some cavers thought it was a design defect, but actually it was provided as a feature. The flat area allows one to cant the ascender then slide it down the rope without opening the cam. This feature was later abandoned.


Version F (B8)
(#1553)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version F from Julia Bloomer in 2011

This version is 102 mm. tall, 78 mm. wide, 24 mm. thick, and weighs 141 g. The rope channel is 17 mm. wide. The cam radius increases from 38 to 53 mm. over an angle of 37°, giving a 28° cam angle. The tooth pattern is (3.4)^2(3.2)^2(1.2).

The back of the shell is stamped "PETZL" inside an oval, "MAXI 400 KG," "BREVETE," and "FRANCE." The cam has "PETZL" in raised letters on both sides. Each side of the cam safety has an arrow pointing toward the safety pivot and the word "OIL" underneath.

Comments

This ascender features a new cam design that eliminates the cam flat and reduces the number of teeth. The safety has a new shape as well.


Version G (B08)
(#1577)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version G from Julia Bloomer in 2011.

This version is 102 mm. tall, 78 mm. wide, 24 mm. thick, and weighs 141 g. The rope channel is 17 mm. wide. The shell has two significant improvements over Version F. First, this version adds a second, 12.5 mm. diameter upper attachment hole that goes through the back of the ascender only, missing the rope groove. Second, a raised area is stamped into the back of the ascender, increasing the rigidity of the shell.

The cam radius increases from 38 to 53 mm. over an angle of 37°, giving a 28° cam angle. The tooth pattern is (3.4)^2(3.2)^2(1.2). A cylindrical knob on the safety bar assists in operating the safety mechanism.

The back of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo, "MAXI 400 KG," and "BREVETE FRANCE." The word "PETZL" is cast into each side of the cam, and "OIL" and an arrow are stamped on each side of the cam safety.

Comments

This version's shell design is superior to the previous one, and I see no significant disadvantage to the changes, other than the minor increase in ascender thickness. The extra hole is occasionally be useful, depending on which climbing system one chooses to use with this ascender.


Version H (B08)
(#15)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I obtained this ascender from Bob & Bob at the 1988 NSS convention.

This version is right-handed, 100 mm. high, 76 mm. wide, 26 mm. thick, and weighs 145 grams. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide. The shell has a few minor improvements over Version F. The upper attachment hole has been enlarged to a near vertical 19x13.5 mm. oval. A second 15 mm. upper attachment hole is provided. It goes through the back of the ascender only, missing the rope groove. All holes are beveled. A raised area is stamped into the back of the ascender, increasing the rigidity of the shell. A cylindrical cam closing stop is provided.

The cam radius increases from 38 to 52 mm. over an angle of 37°, giving a 25° cam angle. The tooth pattern is (2.3)(2S2.1S1)^2(1S1)^3(1.2). The cam is identical to the one on similar vintage Petzl Croll ascenders, but the cam safety is shaped differently. The large semicircle is eliminated, and a simple elbow shape is used. A cylindrical knob on the safety bar assists in operating the safety mechanism.

The back of the shell is stamped "PETZL," "MAXI 400 KG," and "BREVETE FRANCE." The front of the shell is stamped "CORDE," "ROPE," "Ø MINI." and "10 m/m." A Sieg Heil icon is also stamped onto the front. The word "PETZL" is cast into each side of the cam, and "OIL" and an arrow are stamped on each side of the cam safety.

Comments

This version has a slightly more convenient shell design than the previous one. The comments on the similar Petzl Croll cam slots apply here as well. The cam safety design is more reasonable than that on the Croll. In general this is a well made ascender suitable for a wide range of uses. I see no practical advantage to the cam stop.


Version I (B08)
(#1570)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version I from Dane Hardinge in 2012.

This version is 102 mm. tall, 78 mm. wide, 29 mm. thick, and weighs 144 g. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide. The lower shell is no longer flat; instead it is angled.The upper attachment hole has been enlarged to a near vertical 19.7x13.7 mm. oval. A second 15.5 mm. upper attachment hole is provided. It goes through the back of the ascender only, missing the rope groove. A raised area is stamped into the back of the ascender, increasing the rigidity of the shell. A cylindrical cam closing stop is provided.

The cam is a revised skeletonized casting, plated as before. The cam radius, measured from the pivot, increases from 40 to 53 mm. over an angle of 37 degrees. The cam has number of small conical teeth, all of which have their axes approximately parallel to the upper surface of the cam. The cam has number of small conical teeth, all of which have their axes approximately parallel to the lower surface of the cam. The tooth pattern is (2.3)(2S2.1S1)^2(1S1)^3(1.2), where the "S"s stand for a single longitudinal slot designed for mud removal.

The back of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo and "BREVETE FRANCE." A Sieg Heil icon is stamped onto the front above a UIAA logo. The word "PETZL" is cast into each side of the cam, and "OIL" and an arrow are stamped on each side of the cam safety.

Comments

This version has a slightly more convenient shell design than the previous one. The extra hole may occasionally be useful, and this time all holes are beveled.

The slot in the cam is intended to reduce the risk of ascender slippage due to mud-caked cam teeth. The design appears superior to the holes on the Kong-Bonaiti Cam-Clean, but the slot is too small and it is obstructed by a reinforcing rib. Like the Kong-Bonaiti, I believe that most ropes muddy enough to stop other ascenders will stop the this one too. Although I have not tried this ascender in the appropriate conditions, I doubt that the slot will eliminate the icing problems common to other toothed cam ascenders.

The cam safety design is more reasonable than that on the Croll. In general, this is a well made ascender suitable for a wide range of uses, but the bird droppings finish (a.k.a. spew-vomit) is aesthetically repulsive.


Version J (B08)
(#2066)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version J as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

This version is 102 mm. tall, 78 mm. wide, 31 mm. thick, and weighs 147 g. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide. The lower shell is no longer flat; instead it is angled.The upper attachment hole has been enlarged to a near vertical 19.7x13.7 mm. oval. A second 15.5 mm. upper attachment hole is provided. It goes through the back of the ascender only, missing the rope groove. A raised area is stamped into the back of the ascender, increasing the rigidity of the shell. A cylindrical cam closing stop is provided.

The cam is a revised skeletonized casting, plated as before. The cam radius, measured from the pivot, increases from 38 to 52 mm. over an angle of 37°, giving a 25° cam angle. The cam has number of small conical teeth, all of which have their axes approximately parallel to the upper surface of the cam. The cam has number of small conical teeth, all of which have their axes approximately parallel to the lower surface of the cam. The tooth pattern is (2.3)(2S2.1S1)^2(1S1)^3(1.2), where the "S"s stand for a single longitudinal slot designed for mud removal.

The back of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo and "BREVETE FRANCE." A Sieg Heil icon is stamped onto the front above a UIAA logo. The word "PETZL" is cast into each side of the cam, and "OIL" and an arrow are stamped on each side of the cam safety.

Comments

Version J has an anodized cam safety while Version I does not; otherwise, they are essentially identical.


Version K (B08)
(#1912)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version K from ezAuctionDropOff (eBay) in 2012.

This version is 115 mm. tall, 76 mm. wide, 26 mm. thick, and weighs 150 g. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide. The lower shell is extended compared to the previous version; otherwise, the two versions are essentially identical except for the paint color.

The back of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo and "BREVETE FRANCE." A Sieg Heil icon is stamped onto the front above a UIAA logo. The word "PETZL" is cast into each side of the cam, and "OIL" and an arrow are stamped on each side of the cam safety.

Comments

In my opinion, the extending the shell has no practical benefit to offset the size increase.


Version L (B08)
(#2083)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version K in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

This version is 115 mm. tall, 78 mm. wide, 28 mm. thick, and weighs 152 g. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide.

The back of the shell is stamped with the "97181A," Petzl logo, "BREVETE FRANCE," "ROPES Ø8-13mm," and "CE950082." A Sieg Heil icon is stamped onto the front above a UIAA logo. The word "PETZL" is cast into each side of the cam, and "OIL" and an arrow are stamped on each side of the cam safety.

Comments

Version L adds a CE stamp and rope limits that Version K does not have.


Version M (B08)
(#125)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I obtained this ascender from Bob & Bob at the 1997 NSS convention.

This version is right-handed, 102 mm. high, 76 mm. wide, 35 mm. thick, and weighs 139 grams. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide. The shell has a few minor changes from Version K. First, the back is not flat; instead, the lower part of the shell bends backward. The upper attachment hole is shorter and wider, measuring 18.6x16.6 mm. oval. There is no second upper attachment hole; instead, a triangular cam stop is punched from rear to front. Its location is too high to reach the cam. A raised area is stamped into the back of the ascender, presumably to increase the rigidity of the device. The bend in the shell distorts the lower attachment hole so that it is 14.8 mm. high and 16.3 mm. wide. A 6 mm. accessory cord hole lies outside and slightly above the main lower attachment hole.

The cam radius increases from 37 to 54 mm. over an angle of 35°, giving a 32° cam angle (as opposed to 25° on earlier models). The cam uses a new tooth pattern as well, (3.1.4)(1S1.2S2)^2(1S1.2.3). The cam is identical to those on similar vintage Petzl Croll versions, but the injection-molded plastic cam safety has a different shape, with five thin grooves on top and a sharp point on the outside. Like other versions of the Basic, the cam safety can hook over the cam channel to hold the cam open. The cam rivet is not placed front-to-back which improves the look of the ascender without having any effect on function.

The back of the shell is stamped with "97332F," the Petzl logo, "CE0197 EN567," the UIAA logo, and the Reading is Dangerous icon. The front is stamped with a Sieg Heil icon and "ROPE¥8Ø13" where the ¥ indicates two concentric circles. The Petzl logo is cast into the cam.

Comments

This version uses a new cam design with some nicely-made teeth and a thin, redesigned mud groove that has more clearance, but still seems to be ineffective except in ideal situations. The cam safety remains difficult to use one-handed, but this is more because the ascender is small than a criticism of the safety. The sharp point on the cam safety is mildly uncomfortable, but one can easily file it off.

I do not like the bend in the shell because it increases the ascender thickness with no apparent need to do so. Although the upper attachment hole on earlier versions was not essential, replacing it with an ineffective cam stop does nothing. Remember, these cam stops only increase the ascender strength in unrealistic laboratory tests, they serve no function in proper field use.

All in all, this is a nice ascender.


Version N (B08)
(#2082)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I obtained this ascender in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

This version is right-handed, 104 mm. tall, 76 mm. wide, 33 mm. thick, and weighs 136 g. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide. The shell has two small holes behind the cam that are not present on Version Ma few minor changes from Version M.

The back of the shell is stamped with "98120A," the Petzl logo, "CE0197 EN567," the UIAA logo, and the Reading is Dangerous icon. The front is stamped with a Sieg Heil icon and "ROPE¥8Ø13" where the ¥ indicates two concentric circles. The Petzl logo is cast into the cam.

Comments

The two holes serve no practical field function that I am aware of. I assume that they were included as a manufacturing aid. Similar holes on the handled Petzls can be used to attach the Pompe pulley, but I don't see that happening with the Basic.


Version O (B18AAA)
(#277, 2084)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I obtained a pair of these ascenders from On Rope 1 in 2009. I acquired another in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

This version is right-handed, 104 mm. high, 76 mm. wide, 33 mm. thick, and weigh 137 grams each. The rope channel is 15 mm. wide. The cam radius increases from 39 to 54 mm. over an angle of 34°, giving a 30° cam angle. The tooth pattern is (3.1.4)(1S1.2S2)^2(1S1.2.3).

The only significant difference between this version and the previous one is that this one has a small hole below the cam.

The front of the shell is stamped with "BASIC," an up=pointing arrow with "UP" inside, and a book-with-an-"i" icon. The rear is printed with "EN567: 1997 ¥ 8Ø13," (where the ¥ indicates two concentric circles), "CE0197," "Made in France," the UIAA logo, "08326FK8211," (on one, …8243 on the other), and a scanner code. The Petzl logo is cast into the cam.

Comments

The extra hole does not seem to have a practical application. I assume that it was included as a manufacturing aid.


Version P (B18AAA)
(#1943, 2059)

Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
Front View: Closed Rear View: Closed
 
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging
Front View: Open for Rigging Rear View: Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Basic, Version P from On Rope 1 in 2013. I acquired another in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

This version is 103 mm. tall, 60 mm. wide, 26 mm. thick, and weighs 87 g. The rope channel is 13 mm. wide. The shell was completely redesigned to be considerably smaller than in previous versions. It is stamped from 3 mm. aluminum. The back is not flat; instead, the lower part of the shell bends backward. The upper attachment hole is 14.2 mm. in diameter. The lower attachment hole is 16.0 mm. high and 27.9 mm. wide. There is a plastic piece above the cam pivot channel. It is attached to the shell by a small countersunk screw in the rear and the head of the cam axle in the front.

The cam is also new, and smaller than on previous models. The cam axle is only 34 mm. from the inside of the rope channel, as opposed to 46-48 mm. on earlier versions. The cam is cast from stainless steel with a web design. The cam radius increases from 24 to 45 mm. over an angle of 47°, giving a 38° cam angle. The tooth pattern is (3.4)((1S1)^2.2S2)^2(3.4.3). The injection-molded plastic cam safety has a new shape as well, and is correspondingly smaller. Like on other versions of the Basic, the cam safety can hook over the cam channel to hold the cam open.

The front of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo and an up-pointing arrow labeled "UP." The inside of the shell has a stamped book-with-an-"i" icon. The rear is screened with "Made in France," "CE0082," EN567"1997¤Ø8-11mm," " EN12841:2006 B¤Ø10-11mm140kg," a digital scanner code, and" the UIAA logo. The Petzl logo is cast into the cam.

Comments

This version is considerable smaller and lighter than previous versions. This makes it somewhat more difficult to operate, particularly if I am wearing gloves.

The plastic piece above the cam axle may be unnecessary. It does not touch the cam, but it might function as a cam stop during strength tests. In the field, it might help keep mud out of the cam axle area, but it can also trap mud there.