Next Return Previous

Petzl Pantin

B02 B02ALA & B02ARA B02BLA & B02BRA
 B02 B02ALA & B02ARA B02BLA & B02BRA

Overview


B02
(#129, 2233)

Front Rear
Front Rear

Technical Details

I acquired my Pantin B02 from On Rope 1 in 1999. I acquired two more in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

The Petzl Pantin B02 is 48 mm. tall, 74 mm. wide, 26 mm. thick, and weighs 81 g. (excluding the harness). The cam tooth pattern is (3.2)(1S1)^2(2S2.1S1)^2(2.3), where the "S" designates a single mud slot.

The outside of the rope channel is stamped with a climber icon, "ROPE •8≤Ø≤13," and "MAX 150daN." The shell behind the cam is stamped with the Petzl logo and "PANTIN." The rear of the shell is stamped "99088A." The cam has "Petzl" cast into it.

Comments

The Petzl Pantin is a small ascender designed to be mounted on the side of the right foot. The harness to do so is supplied with the device. The ascender consists of a stamped aluminum shell and an eccentric cam. The cam appears to be the same as that on similar vintage Petzl Basic and Petzl Croll ascenders, but there is no safety. A hole in the cam allows one to clip a carabiner in to keep the cam closed. The harness consists of one strap that runs around the instep and another that runs under the foot. These straps are made fro 18 mm. webbing. A two-piece slip buckle is sewn to the ankle strap, as is the underfoot strap.

The Petzl Pantin was relatively new when I acquired mine, and I never figured out how to get it to work well. Petzl didn't describe it in their catalog, and the directions that come with it don't work. I found that the webbing running under the foot pulled out of the ascender on the very first step I took - which is rather obvious, if you look at the recommended rigging shown in the figure to the left. This may be safe, because when standing on the ground, there isn't far to fall, but it is also useless. I found that I could rig the webbing a different way and get it to hold, which brought me to the next problem. Each step caused the ascender to come off the rope. Petzl's directions (see figure at right) showed this clearly. There is no safety to prevent this, but if one clips a carabiner into the hole in the frame, the device will stay on rope and the carabiner will dig holes in one's ankle. I'm going to try to forget this lemon.

I doubt that there is any device on my site that I've received so many notes expressing total disagreement with my assessment than this one. I am standing behind my assessment - after all, mine fell apart before I could climb three feet, and when I fixed the webbing, I couldn't keep the Pantin on the rope. To be fair, though, I'm allowing the other side to express their views. Here is one sample exchange:

This tool is well liked in the arborist community. Petzl reps say we are the ones that keep it in production.

Most of us have fiddled with the straps some.

The problem with keeping the rope in it is a weight issue, you need to hand feed it for a few feet till the rope is heavy enough to self tail.

Many guys use it daily in the tree, just leave it on till they come down. Takes away a lot of the foot lock and body thrust that is traditional in the trade.

John Paul Sanborn, January 22, 2003

My reply:

John,

A lot of people tell me that they like their Pantin, and there seems to be a crusade building to disagree with my conclusions. That's fine, I'm all in favor of diverse opinions.

If I remember correctly, mine fell apart the moment I put weight on it. I can't endorse the one that I got in the condition that it came out of the box. As I said, my comments only apply to the ones that I've tested - I can't speak for the ones that I never got to try. Until I try one that doesn't disintegrate, I'll let others speak in favor of the Pantin.

John's Response:

Thanks for the reply Gary, I was looking at my comment more of an explanation as to why it has not disappeared yet and a reason for the problem you mentioned on the tailing issue.

I think your description of it being a lemon is what brings people to it's defense, it is more of a niche tool, for people who need to climb short distances then go off rope. There are better tools for long term rope ascent.

The tailing issue is the first thing I hear with people who first try it. I do think Petzl should have that in bold print in the instructions.

If you have any interest in discussion of tree related rope work come on over to http://www.ArboristSite.com

My opinions have nothing whatsoever to do with how these devices will work for you.
I use my devices caving and climbing, so my statements never apply to arborists.
As the main page says, my opinions are of how well my device works for me.
Opinions of how well your device works for you are your responsibility.
Forming your opinions for you is not my responsibility.
 
LATEST
NEWS!
March 2017

The death threats started to decline when I rated the new B02ALA and B02ARA, but I still wondered why so many people had such different experiences than I had. When I acquired Bob Thrun's collection in 2017, I might have found a plausible answer.

Bob had two Pantin B02s in his collection. The ascenders were identical, but the webbing was not. One had the same webbing as my original Pantin. This was a very soft, flexible webbing. The other had a much stiffer, harder webbing. It seems that the original soft webbing was at fault, and plausible that when Petzl realized that it was inadequate, they changed to a webbing that would work with the Pantin.

It appears likely that the people who objected so violently to my initial evaluation of the Pantin were not using one with the same version slings as were supplied with the one Pantin that I evaluated.

This is an example of one reason why I say,
"Never, never, never apply my opinions to your gear!"

LATEST
NEWS!
 

B02ALA & B02ARA
(#276/1501, 2060/2061)

Left: Front Right: Front
Left: Front Right: Front
 
Left: Rear Right: Rear
Left: Rear Right: Rear

Technical Details

I acquired my Pantin B02ALA and B02ARA from On Rope 1 in 2009. I acquired another pair in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

The B02ALA is for the left foot, and the B02ARA is for the right. These Petzl Pantins are 47 mm. tall, 73 mm. wide, 24 mm. thick, and weigh 180 g. each (including the harness supplied with the ascender). The cam is different from the B02 cam, with a different web and different tooth pattern. The B02ALA/B02ARA cam tooth pattern is (3)(2S2.1S1)^3(2.3), where the "S" designates a single mud slot.

The outside of the rope channel is stamped with a book-with-an-"i" icon, an up-pointing arrow with "UP" inside, and "PANTIN LEFT" (respectively, "PANTIN RIGHT"). The shell behind the cam is stamped with "MAXI" and "150daN." The back of the shell is printed with "0819FH9562" (resp. 08309FR5004"), a scanner code, and "Made in France." The cam has the Petzl logo cast into it. The buckle is stamped with the Petzl logo and "PATENTED."

Comments

When I first added the B02ALA and B02ARA, I wrote, Perhaps I will stop receiving hate mail and death threats, because I am not going to give this one a lemon award. This one did not self-destruct. Surprisingly, that is what happened: no more death threats!

There is actually a very good and obvious reason for the difference: The B02 came with a thin, flexible, 18 x 1.2 mm. webbing that easily pulled through the slots in the BO2, while the B02ALA and B02ARA each come with a thick, stiff, 19.6 x 1.9 mm. webbing that fits more tightly in the slots.

I wonder how many people who sent me hate mail were not using the B02, but actually using a B02ALA or B02ARA. Shame on them if they were, for literally not knowing what they were talking about.

I'm pleased to see that Petzl realized that some people have left feet, and use them.


B02BLA & B02BRA
(#1947/1948, 2062/2063)

Left: Front Right: Front
Left: Front Right: Front
 
Left: Rear Right: Rear
Left: Rear Right: Rear

Technical Details

I acquired my Pantin B02BLA and B02BRA from On Rope 1 in 2013. I acquired another pair in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

The B02BLA is for the left foot, and the B02BRA is for the right. These Petzl Pantins are 45 mm. tall, 64 mm. wide, and 23 mm. thick. Each weighs 53 g. bare and 80 g. including the harness supplied with the ascender. The cam is different from the earlier cams, with a different web and different tooth pattern. The B02ALA/B02ARA cam tooth pattern is (3.4)(1S1.1S1.2S2)^2(3.4.3), where the "S" designates a single mud slot. The cam radius increases from 25 to 45 mm. over an angle of 47°, giving a 36° cam angle.

The outside of the rope channel is stamped with a book-with-an-"i" icon, an up-pointing arrow with "UP" inside, and "PANTIN LEFT" (respectively, "PANTIN RIGHT"). The shell behind the cam is stamped with "Pat." The back of the shell is printed with "Made in France," a scanner code, and "13010FP0177" (resp. 12346FP0309"). and The cam has the Petzl logo cast into it. The buckle has a pull tab with Petzl logo on each side.

Comments

Petzl lightened their ascender line, reducing the weight of the Basic and Croll as well as the Pantin. The weight saved on the Pantin is particularly impressive.


B02CLA B02210 Catch &
B02CRA /w B02200 Catch
(#1947/1948, 2062/2063)

Left: Front Right: Front
Left: Front Right: Front
 
Left: Rear Right: Rear
Left: Rear Right: Rear
 
Left: Front Right: Front
Left: Front, Open for Rigging Right: Front, Open for Rigging
 
Left: Rear, Open for Rigging Right: Rear, Open for Rigging
Left: Rear, Open for Rigging Right: Rear, Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired these from Inner Mountain Outfitters at the 2017 NSS Convention.

The B02CLA is for the left foot, and the B02CRA is for the right. The B02210 safety catch came as a separate kit for the user to install on the left ascender. The B02200 kit was for the right ascender. The two kits are not interchangeable.

These Petzl Pantins are is 45 mm. tall, 64 mm. wide, 23 mm. thick, and weigh 53 g. with the catch installed. Adding the harness supplied with the ascender brings the combined weight to 80 g.

The B02CLA/B02CRA cam tooth pattern is (3.4)(1S1.1S1.2S2)^2(3.4.3), where the "S" designates a single mud slot. The cam radius increases from 25 to 45 mm. over an angle of 47°, giving a 36° cam angle.

The safety catch is injection molded from black plastic. It fastens to the underside of the cam with a 3.5 mm. sex bolt. A supplied spring holds the catch against the base of the cam. When the cam is opened, the shell interferes with the safety catch, thus preventing opening the cam. If the safety catch is moved away from the cam (opposing the spring), it will clear the shell and the cam will open. At full open the safety can be released and the spring will hold the safety against the back of the shell.

The outside of the rope channel is stamped with an up-pointing arrow with "UP" inside, a book-with-an-"i" icon, and "PANTIN LEFT" (respectively, "PANTIN RIGHT"). The shell behind the cam is stamped with "Pat." The back of the shell is printed with "17B0064082241" (resp. "17C0069409969") and a scanner code. The buckle has a pull tab with Petzl logo on each side. There are no markings on the safety catches.

Comments

Except for a minor change to the semi-tubular rivet used as the cam axle and different markings printed on the rear, the B02CLA & B02CRA appear to be identical to the B02BLA & B02BRA.

Installing the B02200 safety catch kit on the B02CRA was easy, requiring two screwdrivers. I recommend using a drop of Loctite® thread locker or equivalent. Installing the B02210 on the B02CLA proved to be impossible, at least with the parts provided, since Petzl included a short semi-tubular rivet in place of the female sex bolt. This was clearly an unintentional error that got past their quality control.