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Mammut

Mammut Crag Light Fuse
Mammut Crag Light Fuse
 
Vader Alpine Vader Light Mammut Wall Alpine
Vader Alpine Vader Light Wall Alpine

Overview


Mammut
(#799)

Front Rear Top
Front Rear Top
 
Left Right Bottom
Left Right Bottom

Technical Details

I acquired my Mammut from Justin Tease in 2004.

The Mammut is forged from aluminum alloy and then hard anodized. Mine is 55 mm. long, 47 mm. wide, 101 mm. high, and weighs 60 g. The slots are 30 mm. long and 15 mm. wide. The top of the Omega oval carabiner that I use for comparing belay tubes sits 14 mm. below the ends of the slots. The keeper is flexible, plastic covered cable. The keeper is pinned in place, and the ends are not visible.

One side of the Mammut is etched with the Mammut logo, and the other with a rigging icon.

Comments

The plastic-coated cable keeper is moderately flexible, but stiff enough that it tends to stay out from under the rope.


Crag Light
(#1834)

Front Rear Top
Front Rear Top
 
Left Right Bottom
Left Right Bottom

Technical Details

I acquired my Mammut Crag Light from Jeremiah Logemann in 2014.

The Mammut Crag Light is a notched belay tube. forged from aluminum alloy and then hard soft anodized. Mine is 40 mm. long, 57 mm. wide, 84 mm. high, and weighs 53 g. It has two v-grooves and a plastic-covered cable keeper. The slots are 34 mm. long and 14 mm. wide. The top of the Omega oval carabiner that I use for comparing belay tubes sits 24 mm. below the ends of the slots.

One side of the Mammut is screened with the a climber illustration, "MAMMUT," and a hand holding a rope illustration. The other side is screened with a book-with-an-"i" icon, "091-06-31," and "MAMMUT."

Comments

Although the Crag Light looks similar to the Vader Light, the shell is different, as is the location of the keeper attachment between the notches.

The plastic-coated cable keeper is stiff enough that it tends to stay out from under the rope.


Fuse
(#845)

Front Rear Top
Front Rear Top
 
Left Right Bottom
Left Right Bottom

Technical Details

I acquired my Fuse from Eastern Mountain Sports in 2007.

The Fuse is forged from aluminum alloy and then hard anodized. Mine is 46 mm. long, 47 mm. wide, 75 mm. high, and weighs 42 g. The slots are 30 mm. long and 16 mm. wide. The top of the Omega oval carabiner that I use for comparing belay tubes sits 10 mm. below the ends of the slots. The bottom of the Fuse has a slope so that one end is 26 mm. high and the other only 12 mm. The keeper is flexible, plastic covered cable. The keeper is staked in place, and the ends are not visible.

Both sides of the Fuse have plastic inserts with the Mammut logo.

Comments

I acquired my Mammut from Eastern Mountain Sports in 2007.

The Fuse has a sloped bottom so I almost placed it with the Slotted Block Belay Devices, but the thin walls convinced me to place it here. The slope acts so that the rope will pull the carabiner to one side. This allows the user to vary the friction somewhat, provided they know in advance which way to rig the Fuse. The slots are shorter than normal, and combined with the shallow carabiner depth, this leads to more friction.

The plastic Mammut logo on the side is too pretty to scuff up on the rocks. Someone will undoubtedly tell me that the plastic is there to keep me from burning my fingers, but I prefer not to let my devices get that hot, if I can help it.


Vader Alpine
(#1687)

Front Rear Top
Front Rear Top
 
Left Right Bottom
Left Right Bottom

Technical Details

I acquired my Mammut Vader Alpine new from Mountain Gear in 2010.

The Vader Alpine is a notched belay tube. It is forged from aluminum alloy and then soft anodized. The Vader has two slots with v-grooves, release eyes, and a plastic covered cable keeper. Mine is 40 mm. long, 96 mm. wide, 97 mm. high, and weighs 66 g. The slots are 36 mm. long and 15 mm. wide. The top of the Omega oval carabiner that I use for comparing belay tubes sits 19 mm. below the ends of the slots. There is a subtrapezoidal carabiner hole at one end and a subtriangular accessory hole at the other.

Both sides are screened with "MAMMUT," and one side also has "060-01-10."

Comments

The Vader is another guide-type belay tube. The most interesting feature is the kinked wire, which I consider more of a gimmick than an important feature. The cutouts reduce weight, but they also reduce the heat transfer surface area, causing the Vader to run hotter than it otherwise would.


Vader Light
(#1686)

Front Rear Top
Front Rear Top
 
Left Right Bottom
Left Right Bottom

Technical Details

I acquired my Mammut Vader Light new from Mountain Gear in 2010.

The Mammut Vader Light is a notched belay tube. It is forged from aluminum alloy and then soft anodized. The Vader Light has two slots with v-grooves and a plastic covered cable keeper. Mine is 43 mm. long, 51 mm. wide, 97 mm. high, and weighs 53 g. The slots are 34 mm. long and 15 mm. wide. The top of the Omega oval carabiner that I use for comparing belay tubes sits 13 mm. below the ends of the slots.

Both sides are screened with "MAMMUT," and one side also has "050-01-09."

Comments

I prefer the smaller size of the Vader Light to the larger Vader, mainly because I do not need the extra carabiner hole. Like for the Vader, the kinked wire is a gimmick than an important feature, and the cutouts reduce weight, but also reduce the heat transfer surface area, causing the Vader Light to run hotter than it otherwise would.


Wall Alpine
(#1865)

Front Rear Top
Front Rear Top
 
Left Right Bottom
Left Right Bottom

Technical Details

I acquired my Mammut Wall Alpine from Alpinsport Basis GmbH in 2015.

The Wall Alpine is a notched belay tube. The Wall Alpine has two slots with v-grooves, release eyes, and a plastic covered cable keeper. It is forged from aluminum alloy and then soft anodized. Mine is 39 mm. long, 95 mm. wide, 92 mm. high, and weighs 67 g. There is a subtrapezoidal carabiner hole at one end and a subtriangular accessory hole at the other. The slots are 35 mm. long and 14 mm. wide. The top of the Omega oval carabiner that I use for comparing belay tubes sits 21 mm. below the ends of the slots.

One side is printed with "Ø 7.5-10.5mm EN 15151-2," a book-with-an-"i" icon, "06-14," a rigging illustration, and "MAMMUT," The other side is screened with another rigging illustration, a carabiner icon followed by "▼," and another carabiner icon followed by "▶."

Comments

The Mammut Wall Alpine is very similar to the Mammut Vader Alpine. The obvious difference is that the Wall Alpine does not have the keeper cable kinks that the Vader Alpine has, but there are minor - and essentially irrelevant - differences in the body as well.