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Ural-Alp

Hauler, ver. A Hauler, ver. B Big Hauler Double Hauler
Hauler, ver. A Hauler, ver. B Big Hauler Double Hauler

Overview


Ural-Alp Hauler, Version A
(#644)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Side Open for Rigging
Side Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Ural-Alp Hauler, Version A from John E. Weinel, Inc. in 1994.

The Ural-Alp Hauler, Version A is 88 mm. tall, 67 mm. wide, and 29 mm. thick. Mine weighs 115 g.

The Ural-Alp is a Russian pulley made primarily from titanium. The side plates are engine turned to give a beautiful finish. They pivot on the pulley axle, which is a special bolt. The nut is center-punched to keep it from releasing. The pulley appears to be aluminum. Both the pulley and cam ride on nylon bushings.

The spring-loaded cam is machined from titanium. A spring-loaded pin can be depressed to hold the cam in the open position.

Comments

The cam teeth are sharp cut pyramids that are not exactly rope-friendly. I find that the teeth drag if one tries to use the pulley with the cam locked open, to the point that they snag the rope. In general, the Ural-Alp does not work as well as the Rock Exotica Wall Hauler.

Warning:
Ural-Alp hauler should never be used to be used to support human loads.
 

Ural-Alp Hauler, Version B
(#732, 2654)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Side Open for Rigging
Side Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Ural-Alp Hauler, Version B from USHBA in 2000. I acquired another in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

The Ural-Alp Hauler, Version B is 87 mm. tall, 67 mm wide, and 29 mm. thick. Mine weighs 116 g.

Comments

Version B is nearly identical to Version A. The only functional difference I noticed is that Version B has a brass-clad pulley. In addition to other markings, this one has "4.5 kN" stamped inside the frame.

Warning:
Ural-Alp hauler should never be used to be used to support human loads.

Big Hauler
(#796)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Side Open for Rigging
Side Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Big Hauler from Ural Sport in 2004.

The Ural-Alp Big Hauler is 126 mm. tall, 132 mm. wide, and 43 mm thick. Mine weighs 541 g.

The Big Hauler follows a standard rescue pulley pattern with the addition of an ascender-style cam to the side. The front and rear plates are painted 4.5 mm. metal, perhaps aluminum. Each plate has a 25 mm. drilled eye. The front plate pivots on the pulley axle to allow rigging.

The pulley has a 15 mm. wide U-shaped groove with a 45 mm minimum diameter. It pivots on a 10 mm. steel bolt. There appears to be a nylon bushing between the pulley and the front plate. I did not disassemble my big hauler to examine the bearing.

The cam is an investment-cast eccentric cam with downward-sloping teeth in an irregular 2.1.2.3.2.2.1.2.2.3.2.1.2 pattern. The cam pivots on a 7.5 mm. steel bolt and a nylon bushing. A spring forces the cam against the pulley. A small cam stop prevents opening the cam far enough to damage the spring. A spring-loaded catch allows one to lock the cam in the open position by opening the cam and depressing the catch button so that the other end projects from the back of the cam and catches against the rear plate.

The front plate is stamped with "RUSSIA," "URAL-ALP," and "45 KN" under the pulley axle. The rear plate is stamped "40 KN" under the cam axle.

Comments

The Big Hauler is a solid pulley. I find it large for my personal needs, but as group gear, it has its place.


Double Hauler
(#797)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Side Open for Rigging
Side Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Double Hauler 34.06 from Ural Sport in 2004.

The Ural-Alp Double-Hauler 34.06 is 104 mm. tall, 70 mm wide, and 40 mm. thick. Mine weighs 173 g.

The Ural-Alp Double-Hauler is another Russian pulley made primarily from titanium, and primarily a double-rope version of the Ural-Alp Hauler. The side plates are engine turned to give a beautiful finish. They pivot on the pulley axle, which is a special bolt. The nut is center-punched to keep it from releasing. There are two pulleys on the Double Hauler which appear to be nickel-plated aluminum. Both the pulleys and cam ride on nylon bushings.

There is only one cam, which engages the rope running over the rear pulley. The cam is spring-loaded and machined from titanium. A spring-loaded pin can be depressed to hold the cam in the open position. The cam teeth are sharp cut pyramids that are not exactly rope-friendly. I find that the teeth drag if one tries to use the pulley with the cam locked open, to the point that they snag the rope. The cam axle is long enough to provide a stop for the swinging front plate.

The Ural-Alp is marked "RUSSIA" and "URAL-ALP" on the front, and "KOZLOV DESIGNS" on the back.

Comments

Serguei Khramtsov (of Ural Sport) wrote me to say:

The Double Hauler's (34.06) instruction and my ebay description have a mistake. The real working range of the device (as for Ural-Alp's - USHBA's Hauler 34.05) is 9,5-10,5mm.
Warning:
The Ural-Alp Double Hauler should never be used to be used to support human loads.