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Petzl

ASAP, Version A ASAP, Version B ASAP Lock
ASAP, Version A ASAP, Version B ASAP Lock
 
Macrograb B52 Version A Macrograb B52 Version B Micrograb B53 Micrograb B53A
Macrograb B52 Version A Macrograb B52 Version B Micrograb B53 Micrograb B53A

Overview


ASAP, Version A
(#880, 2630)

Front Rear
Front Rear

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl ASAP from Inner Mountain Outfitters at the 2007 NSS Convention. I acquired another in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

My Petzl ASAP, Version A is 89 mm. long, 136 mm. wide, 38 mm. high, and weighs 339 g. The ASAP shell is stamped and bent from 3.7 mm. aluminum sheet and then anodized. The left side of the shell is bent into an 18 mm. rope channel, and the upper right side is bent to hold the axle for the wheel assembly. Two 18 mm. holes bear the top provide the main attachment point. A small hole near the base allows attaching a keeper sling. A black plastic piece extends down from the axle to the base of the ASAP, creating a cover for the wheel assembly.

The heart of the ASAP is a toothed wheel that rotates on an arm that pivots from the axle in the shell. The arm is spring-loaded. The wheel sits between two arm pieces. The rear one is stamped from 1.9 mm. stainless steel, and the front one appears to be forged from aluminum. The wheel itself has alternating rows of three down-pointing teeth each. The wheel rotates on an 8 mm. stainless steel axle. The wheel turns freely in both directions, but there is a hidden mechanism that causes it to catch in a fall.

The front of the shell is tamped with an up-pointing arrow labeled "UP," a rigging icon, and a book-with-an-"i" icon. The rear of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo, "MADE IN FRANCE," "PATENTED," "CE0197," "EN 353-2," a rope icon with an arrow pointing to a book icon overlapping an "i" in a triangle, and "06318LAØ251." The front of the plastic cover has the Petzl logo and "ASAP" molded into it. The wheel holder has the Petzl logo in raised relief.

Comments

One attaches one's safety lanyard to the ASAP using a supplied carabiner clipped into the holes at the top of the ASAP. It is essential that the carabiner captures the rope as well.

The instructions sate that the ASAP is suitable for specific Beal 11 mm. and Edelweiss 13 mm. polyamide ropes. The instructions state that the ASAP will catch in 1 m. The instructions note that the ASAP must be shielded from dirt (no muddy caves, I suppose). They also warn that using a keeper cord may cause the ASAP to fail to catch. There are three warning icons in the instructions: a head with helmet icon, the don't catch arrows or else your fingers will get warm icon, and the keep your girl fiend's hair out of gears icon.

If the wheel locks, raising it on the rope will unlock it. Removing the ASAP from the rope is much like unlocking an eccentric cam ascender: after disconnecting the lanyard, just thumb the wheel downward while lifting the ASAP.

The toothed wheel is a fascinating idea. If the ASAP wasn't so expensive, I would probably buy one to try as an ascender. I would have to modify it by cutting away the plastic cover and drilling a hole in the shell (yes, voiding the warranty). It isn't that I expect great results, I'm just curious about how well the wheel would work as an ascender cam. I suppose I'd have to add a faster-acting clutch as well, or maybe a ratchet. Don't mind me, I'm just thinking…


ASAP, Version B
(#1835)

Front Rear
Front Rear

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl ASAP, Version B from Inner Mountain Outfitters at the 2014 NSS Convention.

My Petzl ASAP, Version B is 89 mm. long, 110 mm. wide, 37 mm. high, and weighs 297 g. The ASAP shell is stamped and bent from 4.0 mm. aluminum sheet and then anodized. The left side of the shell is bent into an 16.3 mm. rope channel, and the upper right side is bent to hold the axle for the wheel assembly. Two subtriangular holes bear the top provide the main attachment point.

The heart of the ASAP is a toothed wheel that rotates on an arm that pivots from the axle in the shell. The arm is spring-loaded. The wheel sits between two arm pieces. The rear one is stamped from 2.0 mm. stainless steel, and the front one appears to be forged from aluminum. The wheel itself has alternating rows of three down-pointing teeth each. The wheel rotates on an 8 mm. stainless steel axle. The wheel turns freely in both directions, but there is a hidden mechanism that causes it to catch in a fall.

The front of the shell is tamped with an up-pointing arrow labeled "UP," and a rigging icon. The inside of the shell has a stamped book-with-an-"i" icon. The rear of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo, "MADE IN FRANCE," and "PATENTED." The rear is screened with "CE 0082," "EN 353-2:2002," a rope icon with an arrow pointing to a book-with-an-"i" icon, "EN12841 :2006 A," "¤ Ø 10-13mm Max 100kg," a scanner code, and "14126LL4866."

Comments

Version B is similar to Version A, but considerably smaller and lighter. Petzl seems to be making an effort to reduce the size and weight of their gear, and in this case, they appear to have succeeded without detrimental side effects.


ASAP Lock
(#1835)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Open for Rigging
Open for Rigging

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl ASAP Lock from Expé-Spelemat in 2014.

My Petzl ASAP Lock is 96 mm. long, 126 mm. wide, 47 mm. high, and weighs 404 g. The shell is stamped and bent from 4.0 mm. aluminum sheet and then anodized. The left side of the shell is bent into an 16 mm. rope channel, and the upper right side is bent to hold the axle for the wheel assembly. A black plastic piece extends along the top of the cam channel, creating a cover for the wheel assembly. Arms on the front and rear extend from the center of the device to a crosspiece connecting their ends. These arms pivot at the body. The user's lanyard should be sewn to the crosspiece.

The heart of the ASAP is a toothed wheel that rotates on an arm that pivots from the axle in the shell. The arm is spring-loaded. The wheel sits between two arm pieces made of 1.9 mm. stainless steel, but there are several other metal and plastic parts to the housing, including two plastic safeties that also function as redundant hold-opens, much like the catch on an eccentric cam ascender. The wheel itself has alternating rows of three down-pointing teeth each. The wheel rotates on an 8 mm. stainless steel axle. There is a locking mechanism with a plastic button controlling engagement. In the unlocked position, the wheel turns freely in both directions, but there is a hidden mechanism that causes it to catch in a fall. In the locked position, a ratchet prevents the wheel from turning backward.

The front of the shell is tamped with an up-pointing arrow labeled "UP," "ASAP LOCK," and the a a book-with-an-"i" icon. The rear of the shell is stamped with the Petzl logo, "MADE IN FRANCE," and "PATENT PENDING."The rear is screened with "CE 0082," "EN 353-2:2002," a rope icon with an arrow pointing to a book-with-an-"i" icon, "EN12841 :2006 A," "¤ Ø 10-13mm Max 100kg," a scanner code, and "14140LM7055." The wheel holder has an arrow labeled "LOCK" stamped under the lock button.

Comments

So much for reducing size and weight, the ASAP lock is considerably heavier than either ASAP version. On the other hand, having a positive lock is advantageous. Being able to disengage the ratchet is important, since the wheel needs to rotate in reverse if one is to open the ASAP LOCK to remove it from the rope.


Macrograb B52, Version A
(#747)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Side Top
Side Top

Technical Details

I acquired my Macrograb, Version A from On Rope 1 in September, 2000.

My Petzl Macrograb B52, Version A is 114 mm. long, 92 mm. wide, 51 mm. high, and weighs 336 g.

The Macrograb looks and functions like a Type 1 Lever Cam Ascender, but it is marketed as a rope grab. The frame is milled from aluminum (much like the Rock Exotica ascenders). The rectangular-shaped rope channel is 20 mm. wide. The inside of the shell has a milled depression that the cam forces the rope into. This spreads the load on the rope, and may increase the holding power of the ascender. It is claimed to help reduce rope damage under shock loading, but I can't confirm this. Rock Exotica pioneered this feature, and Petzl acquired it from them.

The cam has 5 rounded teeth, and is held by a cable keeper that doubles as a spring that applies a significant closing force to the cam. The keeper is attached to the cam by a small set screw. The cam axle is an 8 mm. Allen-head cap screw secured with a lock nut. The top of the rope channel is rounded off so that the rope does not bend over any sharp corners. In addition to the axle hole, the frame has three small holes. One is for the keeper, and a second, drilled from the side, accepts an set screw to hold the keeper in place. The third hole, through the back of the frame, does not serve any obvious purpose.

The front of the frame is stamped with an arrow pointing up, the Petzl logo, "12≤Ø≤19mm," "1/2"≤Ø≤3/4," " "EN567," "CE 0197," an icon showing how to rig the cam, and Petzl's Reading-Is-Dangerous icon. The rear of the frame is stamped with "001966" which I assume is a serial number or date code. The frame spine is stamped with "USE ONLY APPROVED 12"-3/4" (12-19mm) SYNTHETIC ROPES," "CHECK UNIT BEFORE EACH USE," and "REMOVE FROM SERVICE AFTER SUBJECTED TO LOAD OR FALL." The rear of the cam has an arrow stamped on it, I don't know what it intends to show.

Comments

Remove from service after it's been loaded once? Are you kidding me? I understand for a hard fall, but not for a simple static load. Why do Doctors let Lawyers live?

The Macrograb is a clunky-looking device. Its a shame that Petzl couldn't round the inside of the rope channel, after all, most of us use round ropes instead of square ones. The cap screw axle is a cheap way to mount the cam, and it makes it excessively difficult to put the Macrograb on rope or take it off. Petzl supplied a 5 mm. Allen wrench for the cap screw but forgot to provide a wrench for the nut. This is rather surprising, since they included a 2.5 mm. Allen wrench to remove the two screw holding the cable to the cam and frame! It really doesn't matter, most people will quickly lose both Allen wrenches.

The minimum rope size specified for the Macrograb means that it will only be of interest to the "bigger is better" crowd. They are welcome to it.


Macrograb B52, Version B
(#2643)

Front Rear
Front Rear
 
Side Top
Side Top

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Macrograb B52, Version B in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

My Petzl Macrograb B52, Version B is 114 mm. long, 90 mm. wide, 53 mm. high, and weighs 340 g.

Version B has an 8 mm. hole drilled throug the shell, directly in the rope path above the cam.

Version B has the same markings as Version A, except the rear of the frame is stamped with "03093K" instead of "001966"

Comments

I do nt know what the extra hole in the shell is for, and the instructions don't give an explanation.

This Macrograb came with three Allen wrenches and three replacement keeper cables.


Micrograb B53
(#746, 2642)

Front View Rear View Side View
Front View Rear View Side View

Technical Details

I acquired my Micrograb from On Rope 1 in September, 2000. I acquired another in 2017 as part of Bob Thrun's collection.

The Micrograb is a smaller version of the Macrograb. The frame is milled from aluminum. The rectangular-shaped rope channel is 15.7 mm. wide. The inside of the shell has a milled depression that the cam forces the rope into. This spreads the load on the rope, and may increase the holding power of the ascender. It is claimed to help reduce rope damage under shock loading, but I can't confirm this. Rock Exotica pioneered this feature, and Petzl acquired it from them.

The cam has 8 rounded teeth, and is held in place by a cable keeper that doubles as a spring that applies a moderate closing force to the cam. The keeper is attached to the cam by a small set screw. The cam axle is an 8 mm. Allen-head cap screw secured with a lock nut. The top of the rope channel is rounded off so that the rope does not bend over any sharp corners. In addition to the axle hole, the frame has two small holes. One is for the keeper, and a second, drilled from the side, accepts an Allen screw to hold the keeper in place.

The front of the frame is stamped with an arrow pointing up, "EN567," "9≤Ø≤13mm, "3/8"≤Ø≤1/2," " "CE 0197," an icon showing how to rig the cam,the Petzl logo, and Petzl's "reading is dangerous" icon. The rear of the frame is stamped with "00175L" which I assume is a serial number or date code.

Comments

The Micrograb is another clunky-looking device. Its a shame that Petzl couldn't round the inside of the rope channel, after all, most of us use round ropes instead of square ones. The cap screw axle is a cheap way to mount the cam, and it makes it excessively difficult to put the Macrograb on rope or take it off. Petzl supplied a 5 mm. Allen wrench for the cap screw but forgot to provide a wrench for the nut. Things are even more hilarious than on the Macrograb: the cam set screw requires a 2 mm. Allen wrench while the frame set screw requires a 1.5 mm. wrench. In all, three wrenches are provided to be lost at the first opportunity.

I suggest that anyone seriously considering the Petzl Micrograb look at the PMI Grip-Tech Jr. before committing themselves.


Micrograb B53A
(#1884)

Front View Rear View
Front View Rear View

Technical Details

I acquired my Petzl Micrograb B53A from On Rope 1 in 2016.

My Petzl Micrograb B53A is 76 mm. long, 81 mm. wide, 34 mm. high, and weighs 144 g.

The frame is milled from aluminum. The rectangular-shaped rope channel is 15.3  mm. wide. The inside of the shell has a milled depression that the cam forces the rope into. This spreads the load on the rope, and may increase the holding power of the Micrograb. The top of the rope channel is rounded off so that the rope does not bend over any sharp corners.

The cam has 7 rounded teeth. The cam axle is 7.5 mm. in diameter and held in place by two set screws. A captive spring pushed the cam to the closed position.

One side is [printed with "Pat. Pend.," "EN567:2013," "10Ø13mm," "16B0009514307," "CE0082," a scanner conde, and "EA[."The other side has a printed Petzl logo and is stamped with an up-pointing arrow with "UP" inside, book-with-an-"i" icon, and "MICROGRAB." The spine is printed with the UL "CLASSIFIED" logo, "MEETS NFPA," "1983 (2012 ED.)," "T MBS 5kN, and "10Ø13mm."

Comments

The Micrograb B53A has bettter lines than the B53, but I am still not impressed. I like the thumb tab , but that is about it.

Although Petzl supplies an Allen wrench, I would think that they could find a better way to open the B53A for rigging than relying on such a tiny tool.

I still haven't found a square rope to fit the square channel.

Enough said, this isn't something that I would put up with for what I do.