Next Return Previous

Rose Dynescape

Version A Version B
Version A Version B

Overview


506416
(#2439)

Front View
Front View
 
Rear View
Rear View
 
Side View
Side View

Technical Details

I acquired my Rose Dynescape 506416 from S&E Industrial Supply Co. Inc. in 2017.

My Rose Dynescape 506416 is 326 mm. tall, 117 mm. wide, 63 mm. thick, and weighs 1350 g. I cannot do much better than repeat the following description from in the manual:

The Dynescape descender assembly consists of a central sheave protected by an aluminum housing; two internal spring-loaded pawls; two rope roller guides; a moving cam; a handle; an external rope guide; and a length of 1/2 inch (13 mm) three strand twisted polyester rope with one free end (spliced so the rope may not be removed from the descender) and one metal teardrop thimble end.

My Dynescape 506416 also came with two carabiners.

There are no markings on the descender, but it is covered with several stickers that are too wordy to justify reproducing here. The carabiners are ISC autolocking D carabiners stamped"ISC UK KH 205" on one side and "ANSI Z359-1PL16kN 98C on the other. The rope has a two-page tag attached to the eye splice that gives two rigging illustrations.

The hook has a number of stampings, including several warnings and also some references to U.S. Patents #4434536 and #4528728.

Comments

This Dynescape is designed for industrial rescue applications. I will leave comments on its suitability for that application to those who specialize in interfering with natural selection, but I think that I know what many of them will think.

Reading the manual, I get the impression that the descender and manual might have been designed by corporate liability attorneys. One instruction is particularly onerous: "Return to manufacturer for inspection after each use." This alone is sufficient reason to avoid this device, as it makes it completely impractical to train people on its use. Imagine trying to run a class and having to have a new kit for each practice attempt! This is absurd.

For other uses:

…and with three outs, the inning is over.

The lawyers deserve a Lemon Award for this one.


506630
(#1173)

Front Rear
Front Rear

Technical Details

I acquired my Rose Dynescape 506630 used on eBay from Barry Line in 2008. Barry acquired it from a sporting goods store that was going out of business.

This Rose Dynescape is 515 mm. tall, 240 mm. wide, 180 mm. thick, and weighs 15.7 kg. The Dynescape is an inertia reel descender that contains a 52 foot (16 m.) cable inside a plated steel case. The end of the cable is crimped to form an eye around a swivel, and the swivel has a hinged hook. The hook has a safety catch that helps prevent inadvertent opening. A rubber ball on the cable keeps the end of the cable from retracting inside the housing.

My Dynescape has many stickers and one riveted plaque. The plaque on the lower left front gives the serial number, "T10209B." The most important sticker on the front has the following text:

PART NUMBER:  506630

SERIAL NUMBER:  T10209B

DATE OF MANUFACTURE:  11-12-99

LAST FACTORY SERVICE: ***

FACTORY SERVICE REQUIRED EVERY 2 YEARS

The other sticker on the front says "Rose Manufacturing Company," "Equipment Service Hotline," and "1-888-737-7339."

The rear cover has a logo with "ROSE," "TYPE," and "S.N." in raised relief. Neither the type nor serial number spaces contain entries. The back has one large and one small sticker. The large sticker is too wordy to justify reproducing here; basically it contains instructions for inspection, installation, and use. It also gives the devices specifications and the Rose Manufacturing Company address and telephone. The smaller sticker repeats the address and telephone information, and also states "Made in U.S.A." The operating specifications are worth noting here:

Working load: 75 to 310 lbs (34 to 141 kg)
Rate of descent: 6 ft. (2 m) per second
Cable length: 52 ft. (16 m)

There is also a caution sticker around the edge that gives 22 bullets of warnings.

The hook has a number of stampings, including several warnings and also some references to U.S. Patents #4434536 and #4528728.

Comments

Although this descender is designed for industrial use, some rock climbers are using these or similar models for self-belayed top-roping. Although it is pricey, I can imagine a wealthy climber equipping her home climbing wall with one.